Technician Class Series – Mind the Rules

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Hello everyone and welcome back to my blog!! Today we are going to continue on our series covering the Technician class amateur radio license. We will be talking about the rules! I know, I know, I don’t like rules either and no these rules should not be broken cause it could really cost you.

As always, the correct answers will be in bold. I also recommend that you only read the correct answers when studying for your test. If you do this, when you take your test and you see a question, there will be a better chance that the correct answer will jump out at you easier. Some say that this approach is kind of like cheating, but the way that I see it, you will always be learning something in this hobby and you don’t have to know everything there is to know about the hobby to get your license.

If you would like to purchase a copy of the Technician Class study book that this series is:

Let’s move on to the good  stuff, shall we?


 

QUESTIONS:

T1A03 Which part of the FCC regulations contains the rules governing the Amateur Radio Service?

A. Part 73

B. Part 95

C. Part 90

D. Part 97

Part 97 is part of Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations. You would probably need a wheelbarrow or a wagon or something is you were to carry around a copy of the whole thing. As much as Part 97 is talked about and covered throughout the questions pool and put on this series especially you shouldn’t have too much trouble remembering this, so lets talk about the other three options just for fun.

Part 73 covers Radio and Television Broadcasting. Part 95 is Personal Radio like Citizens Band(CB) and FRS. Part 90 is Land Mobile Radio, this covers things like Emergency Services, businesses, etc.

If you would like to see the whole Part 97, click here to view online or click here to download a copy

 

T1D06 What, if any, are the restrictions concerning transmission of language that may be considered indecent or obscene?

A. The FCC maintains a list of words that are not permitted to be used on amateur frequencies

B. Any such language is prohibited

C. The ITU maintains a list of words that are not permitted to be used on amateur frequencies

D. There is no such prohibition

Amateur Radio is a hobby for all ages, from the youngest to the oldest. As a father, I don’t want my kids to have to listen to someone “swearing like a sailor.” I am glad that I don’t have to worry about that with this hobby. Does a “bad word” slip out every now and then? Sure, it happens, we are all human after all. So just remember to Mind The Rules, and you’ll be good…

§97.113 Prohibited transmissions.

(a) No amateur station shall transmit:

(4) Music using a phone emission except as specifically provided elsewhere in this section; communications intended to facilitate a criminal act;

messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except as otherwise provided herein; obscene or indecent words or language; or false or dec

eptive messages, signals or identification.

T2A11 Which of the following is an FCC rule regarding power levels used in the amateur bands, under normal, non-distress circumstances?

A. There is no limit to power as long as there is no interference with other services

B. No more than 200 watts PEP may be used

C. Up to 1500 watts PEP may be used on any amateur frequency without restriction

D. While not exceeding the maximum power permitted on a given band, use the minimum power necessary to carry out the desired communication

We should always use the lowest amount of power to talk, unfortunately, I don’t think that happens very often. Maybe I’m wrong and it happens more in the big city area, but out in the sticks where I live, more often than not, you need at least medium power to get to a repeater, if not high power. As for the other answers, there is a power limit on every band, so we know that (a) is not the correct answer, some bands have more that jus 200 watts PEP so it can’t be (b). So that leaves 1500 watts on any amateur frequencies with no restrictions and our correct answer. It is not going to be (c) because some bands have only a 200 watt power restriction.

§97.313 Transmitter power standards.

(a) An amateur station must use the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications.

T1A11 When is willful interference to other amateur radio stations permitted?

A. Only if the station being interfered with is expressing extreme religious or political views

B. At no time

C. Only during a contest

D. At any time, amateurs are not protected from willful interference

 I started to write this “further explanation” and an old memory hit me from 15-20 years ago from a young group I was in and I just had to erase what I had and rewrite it.

NO, no, never, never, uh uh uh…Ok, so that might have been a let down to most of you, but maybe just one of my readers remembers the song…I don’t remember the rest of it, but…All that being said, it is never OK, to cause willful interference with anyone!!

§97.101 General standards.

 

(d) No amateur operator shall willfully or maliciously interfere with or cause interference to any radio communication or signal.

T1A04 Which of the following meets the FCC definition of harmful interference?

A. Radio transmissions that annoy users of a repeater

B. Unwanted radio transmissions that cause costly harm to radio station apparatus

C. That which seriously degrades, obstructs, or repeatedly interrupts a radio communication service operating in accordance with the Radio Regulations

D. Static from lightning storms

§97.3 Definitions.

(a) The definitions of terms used in part 97 are:

 

(23) Harmful interference. Interference which endangers the functioning of a radionavigation service or of other safety services or seriously degrades, obstructs or repeatedly interrupts a radiocommunication service operating in accordance with the Radio Regulations.

T1A06 Which of the following services are protected from interference by amateur signals under all circumstances?

A. Citizens Radio Service

B. Broadcast Service

C. Land Mobile Radio Service

D. Radionavigation Service

The radionavigation service is just one of the so-called safety-of-life services, which as always top priority communications. Much like GPS, Marine Radio VHF Channels, Aircraft Landing System and other fall into this category. Causing interference to these systems could put lives in danger. Therefore, knowingly, causing harmful interference with this system, could do a lot more harm than good.

§97.101 General standards.

 

(d) No amateur operator shall willfully or maliciously interfere with or cause interference to any radio communication or signal.

 

§97.303 Frequency sharing requirements.

T

he following paragraphs summarize the frequency sharing requirements that apply to amateur stations transmitting in the frequency bands

specified in §97.301 of this part. Each frequency band allocated to the amateur service is designated as either a secondary service or a primary service.

A station in a secondary service must not cause harmful interference to, and must accept interference from, stations in a primary service.

 

(o) Amateur stations transmitting in the 23 cm band must not cause harmful interference to, and must accept interference from, stations authorized by:

(1) The United States Government in the aeronautical radionavigation, Earth exploration-satellite (active), or space research (active) services;

(2) The FCC in the aeronautical radionavigation service; and

(3) Other nations in the Earth exploration-satellite (active), radionavigation-satellite (space-to-Earth) (space-to-space), or space research (active) services.

T1D10 What is the meaning of the term “broadcasting” in the FCC rules for the amateur services?

A. Two-way transmissions by amateur stations

B. Transmission of music

C. Transmission of messages directed only to amateur operators

D. Transmissions intended for reception by the general public

As an amateur radio operator you can’t operate like an AM/FM or shortwave broadcast station would and transmit directly to the public. The exceptions to this rule are above and we just talked about them.

§97.3 Definitions.

(a) The definitions of terms used in part 97 are:

(10) Broadcasting. Transmissions intended for reception by the general public, either direct or relayed.

T1D12 Under which of the following circumstances may an amateur radio station engage in broadcasting?

A. Under no circumstances

B. When transmitting code practice, information bulletins, or transmissions necessary to provide emergency communications

C. At any time as long as no music is transmitted

D. At any time as long as the material being transmitted did not originate from a commercial broadcast station

Like many commercial radio practices, broadcasting to the general public is forbidden according the Part 97. If the transmission is intended for reception only by amateur radio operators, then it is ok. Things like CW practice, amateur radio bulletins or in an emergency.

§97.111 Authorized transmissions.

 

(b) In addition to one-way transmissions specifically authorized elsewhere in this part, an amateur station may transmit the following types of oneway communications:

(4) Transmissions necessary to providing emergency communications;

(5) Transmissions necessary to assisting persons learning, or improving proficiency in, the international Morse code; and

(6) Transmissions necessary to disseminate information bulletins.

T1D09 Under which of the following circumstances are amateur stations authorized to transmit signals related to broadcasting, program production, or news gathering, assuming no other means is available?

A. Only where such communications directly relate to the immediate safety of human life or protection of property

B. Only when broadcasting communications to or from the space shuttle

C. Only where noncommercial programming is gathered and supplied exclusively to the National Public Radio network

D. Only when using amateur repeaters linked to the Internet

Basically, amateur radio is a last resort when it comes to news gathering for broadcast purposes, because both stipulations must be met. First there can’t be any other form of public broadcasting and second whatever is transmitted has to be assumed that it will assist the general public in protecting their lives and property.

§97.113 Prohibited transmissions.

 

(b) An amateur station shall not engage in any form of broadcasting, nor may an amateur station transmit one-way communications except as specifically provided in these rules; nor shall an amateur station engage in any activity related to program production or news gathering for broadcasting purposes, except that communications directly related to the immediate safety of human life or the protection of property may be provided by amateur stations to broadcasters for dissemination to the public where no other means of communication is reasonably available before or at the time of the event.

T1D03 When is the transmission of codes or ciphers that hide the meaning of a message allowed by an amateur station?

A. Only during contests

B. Only when operating mobile

C. Only when transmitting control commands to space stations or radio control craft

D. Only when frequencies above 1280 MHz are used

I recently had a blog post covering this very topic, click here to check it out. In it I talked about the type of codes that can be used in the amateur radio world.

§97.211 Space telecommand station.

 

 

(b) A telecommand station may transmit special codes intended to obscure the meaning of telecommand messages to the station in space operation.

§97.215 Telecommand of model craft.

(b) The control signals are not considered codes or ciphers intended to obscure the meaning of the communication.

T1D04 What is the only time an amateur station is authorized to transmit music?

A. When incidental to an authorized retransmission of manned spacecraft communications

B. When the music produces no spurious emissions

C. When the purpose is to interfere with an illegal transmission

D. When the music is transmitted above 1280 MHz

I remember several years ago when the creator of the Peanuts comic strip passed away. The crew of the ISS paid a special tribute to him by playing the theme song at the end of their report. The transmission from it was being retransmitted over a local repeater here. That was one of the only time that I have heard legal music on the amateur radio bands.

§97.113 Prohibited transmissions.

(a) No amateur station shall transmit:

(4) Music using a phone emission except as specifically provided elsewhere in this section; communications intended to facilitate a criminal act; messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except as otherwise provided herein; obscene or indecent words or language; or false or deceptive messages, signals or identification.

(c) No station shall retransmit programs or signals emanating from any type of radio station other than an amateur station, except propagation and weather forecast information intended for use by the general public and originated from United States Government stations, and communications, including incidental music, originating on United States Government frequencies between a manned spacecraft and its associated Earth stations. Prior approval for manned spacecraft communications retransmissions must be obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Such retransmissions must be for the exclusive use of amateur radio operators. Propagation, weather forecasts, and manned spacecraft communications retransmissions may not be conducted on a regular basis, but only occasionally, as an incident of normal amateur radio communications.

T1D05 When may amateur radio operators use their stations to notify other amateurs of the availability of equipment for sale or trade?

A. When the equipment is normally used in an amateur station and such activity is not conducted on a regular basis

B. When the asking price is $100.00 or less

C. When the asking price is less than its appraised value

D. When the equipment is not the personal property of either the station licensee or the control operator or their close relatives

As long as you do not try to sell equipment on a regular basis, and the equipment that you are trying to sell is normally used in an amateur station, then it is not a business rule violation.

§97.113 Prohibited transmissions.

(a) No amateur station shall transmit:

(3) Communications in which the station licensee or control operator has a pecuniary interest, including communications on behalf of an employer, with the following exceptions:

(ii) An amateur operator may notify other amateur operators of the availability for sale or trade of apparatus normally used in an amateur station, provided that such activity is not conducted on a regular basis.

T1F13 When must the station licensee make the station and its records available for FCC inspection?

A. At any time ten days after notification by the FCC of such an inspection

B. At any time upon request by an FCC representative

C. Only after failing to comply with an FCC notice of violation

D. Only when presented with a valid warrant by an FCC official or government agent

Although this will probably rarely happen as long as you obey the rules set forth in Part 97. If ever does happen to you, it will probably never happen out of the blue. If you do get a knock at the door and it is the FCC, they will not take NO for an answer, so you better let them in.

§97.103 Station licensee responsibilities.

(c) The station licensee must make the station and the station records available for inspection upon request by an FCC representative.

T1C07 What may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address?

A. Fine or imprisonment

B. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license

C. Require the licensee to be re-examined

D. A reduction of one rank in operator class

§97.23 Mailing address.

Each license grant must show the grantee’s correct name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.


That about wraps it up for this week, next week we will be talking about Tech Frequencies with lots of fun math stuff, yippee!! If you have any comments or questions about today’s topic, please leave them in the comments below.

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73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • Gene

    good information to read.